Ontario Cycle
is moving our store across town at the end of August. Our new location will be 135 Mitchell Rd. (old Bill's Variety) at the corner of Highway 86 (Main Street) and Mitchell Road (see map). We will be easy to access with lots of free parking and right on the way to wherever you might be going.

Until then, be sure to visit our current location in downtown at 241 Main St. E., Listowel and enjoy the in-store savings. Save on in stock new Bicycles until the end of August!!!

Moving Sale applies in-store only.

Like a fine wine, riding is meant to be savored!

If you're reading this article, you're a cyclist, or else you're visiting a cyclist and you found this in the bathroom. Either way, you've probably noticed a leitmotif by now. No, a leitmotif is not a new German carbon-fiber wheel set—it's a theme. And that theme is "going fast."

Yes, we cyclists do like to go fast, don't we? That's why as you flip through the pages of your favorite bike magazine you'll see reviews, articles and ads promising to make you go faster. So if you aren't a cyclist, it may strike you as odd that cycling seems to be less about riding than it is about getting the ride over with as soon as possible. (It also might strike you as odd that your host keeps a product called DZ Nuts in the medicine cabinet—and yes, that stuff goes exactly where you think it does.)

Well, you're right. Enjoyable things should be savored—that's why Teddy Pendergrass never recorded a 35-second song called "Get It Over With." (Though I think he may have recorded an album called "DZ Nuts" back in the '70s.) The same goes for cycling. Sure, if you're racing you should try to finish quickly. But even if you're a racer, you shouldn't treat every ride as training for racing. If anything, you should treat racing as training for your rides. Let's be honest—chances are you're going to lose the race anyway. However, racing will make you a better rider, and riding's what it's all about.

Yet even if we don't race at all, we still feel compelled to name our rides and train for them. Take centuries, for example. It's bad enough that we can't just hop on our bikes and take a long ride without calling it a "century" and stressing out about it, but some of us actually worry about our finishing time too. Really, racing a century is the cycling equivalent of shot gunning a beer. Eventually, you learn that sipping is more enjoyable—and it gets you just as drunk in the end.

Good news! A good bike can be easy to find. A few simple, common sense things can make all the difference between fun and frustration. Many bicycle dealers are not offering their customers what we feel are "really useful bikes". Bikes that are built and equipped for the way most people really ride now or how they could ride in the future. Every bike has a purpose, and there is a place for road racers, downhill and mountain bikes. For the rest of us who don't compete however, it's hard to see past the marketing and hype to find the bicycle that's going to promise comfort, durability and stability on the roadways and paths where we enjoy riding.

What we'd like to show you and get you thinking about is how to keep your new bike from being a "one trick pony". Or shall we say "a one trip pony". It may even turn out that your current bike, with a few thoughtful tweaks, could become an even more perfect bicycle for you.

A quick check of your bike before riding can help prevent those long walks home. It only takes about two minutes. Make it a habit and your chances of a breakdown are greatly reduced.

Check the quick release levers -- Make sure that your quick release levers on your wheels are installed correctly and are properly tight. A runaway wheel is a nasty surprise.

Bounce the Bike -- Pick up your bike 4 or 5 inches off the ground and bounce it once or twice. Listen for unusual rattles, they can indicate loose parts about to fall off.

Check the Brakes -- Check the front and rear brakes separately. Give the levers a good squeeze to make sure they are tight and the cable is securely fastened.