Education

As cycling becomes a more integrated part of our life the genre of bike that best suits this new rider explosion has changed as well. Gone are the days that you would tough out a commute on a mountain bike that you have modified to ride on the street. Today there are much better choices that turn that commute into an enjoyable riding experience.

One in four adult Canadians and one in 10 children have clinical obesity, meaning six million Canadians living with obesity may require immediate support in managing and controlling their weight. As a leading cause of type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease, stroke, arthritis and cancer, the condition impacts those who have obesity, their families, employers, neighbours, health practitioners and governments.

The impact of weight bias and stigma against people with obesity is comparable to that of racial discrimination, and it’s just as common. Obesity stigma translates into significant inequities in employment, health, health care and education, often due to widespread negative stereotypes that persons with obesity are lazy, unmotivated or lacking in self‐discipline.

As we grow older how and when we cycle changes. Cycling has changed so much over the years and the wonderful thing about cycling is that – unlike any other sport – it means different things to different people, even different things to the same person at different points in their life. Cycling has gone back to being a simple way to explore, a way to keep healthy, and a way to enjoy the outdoors. Many boomers haven't been on a bike since grade school - You never really forget how to ride a bike but there is a whole lot more about cycling to consider as a boomer then as a kid.

Some foolproof advice on reducing the odds of theft -- or at least increasing your chances of getting your stolen bike back.